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23
Nov

Emergency admissions are set to rise as Britain prepares for another harsh winter.


In an effort to reduce pressure on frontline staff NHS bosses in Gloucester have launched a campaign encouraging people who are unwell to think about the most appropriate place they should go to seek treatment.

 

The Choose Well initiative helped people make the right choice last winter and reminds them to only visit hospital A&E in an emergency.

 


Chief executive of NHS Gloucestershire, Jan Stubbings, said: "On a typical day in the NHS, hospital emergency departments in Gloucestershire will treat more than 500 people. During the winter this increases and in December, on average, there are 15 per cent more emergency admissions than there are in August.

The hospital emergency departments in Gloucester and Cheltenham have a key role to play in treating people who are seriously ill or injured, but it is vital that hospital staff are able to focus on treating patients in most need of this specialist care.

We are encouraging people to think about the full range of healthcare options, which for non-emergency care can be more convenient and appropriate to meet their needs. These include self care, your local pharmacy and minor injury units at our community hospitals.”

 


Emergency department clinical director at Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Tim Llewellyn, said patients often thought going to A&E was quicker than accessing other services – but this was not usually the case.


[quote top=He said:] A&E is the right place to go if you are seriously unwell or injured but patients with other less serious conditions can save time by using a more appropriate service like seeking advice from their pharmacist, calling their GP surgery or visiting a health access centre. Some conditions can be self-managed or with advice over the phone so it would more appropriate to contact NHS Direct or speak to your pharmacist.[/quote]

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